Job Description for Accidental Entrepreneurs

Ami Kassar is a typical accidental entrepreneur. Kassar had spent a decade in senior management with a large, national credit card company based in Philadelphia. When the recession hit in 2008, he suddenly found himself unemployed. His employer did not survive the recession-induced shakeout in the financial industry.

via Job Description for Accidental Entrepreneurs – Business Insider.

Entrepreneurs are folks that have no Plan ‘A’. But they have Plans “B-Z”. quotes_motivation_corporations_entrepreneurship_entrepreneur_1280x800_30081

Entrepreneurship is no accident. It is a choice. Contrary to popular opinion, choosing to be an entrepreneur is less about being your own boss or enjoying the freedom to come and go to work as you please. Being an entrepreneur, and a successful one at that, needs much more discipline than being in a job. The hardest part is that you have to take responsibility for yourself. It’s much more fun though – the uncertainty of your next paycheck, the fear of something not working, the prospect of keeping your team and partners motivated – and is motivated by the opportunity to make a difference.

Are you an entrepreneur at heart? Jump into the fray. Now is as good a time as any, especially here in India. And if you still have doubts, start by being an entrepreneur in your current role. Don’t wait for instructions. Don’t worry about policy. Don’t cry about the absence of an ecosystem. You have the chance to create an ecosystem that will allow you to grow. Follow your heart and go build the life of your dreams.

Good luck!

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Reimagining India: MIT Sloan’s Prof. Yasheng Huang

India is known globally for the rise of its information-technology and software industry. Yet in this video interview, Yasheng Huang, a professor of global economics and management at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and essayist from Reimagining India: Unlocking the Potential of Asia’s Next Superpower Simon & Schuster, November 2013, warns the country against becoming too dependent on those sectors. He argues India’s potential will only be realized if the country develops its manufacturing and services sectors, which requires labor-market reforms and significant investments in both education and social services. Without those, India will not only face growing social inequality but could also jeopardize its pipeline of college-ready students critical to the high-tech industry.

via Reimagining India: A conversation with Yasheng Huang | McKinsey & Company.

Don’t listen to her. She’s only a child!

I stumbled upon this video that made me numb and hopeful at the same time.

Severn Suzuki addresses the UN conference on Environment 1992 at Rio on behalf ECO  (Environmental Childrens Organisation) run by a bunch of 12 and 13 year olds. She must have turned 33 this year. 2 decades and 1 year on, we’ve only plundered more.

When will we STOP!!?

Her morality accuses our ethics.

Did you hear the anger, the angst and the anxiousness? Did you hear her plead for us to stop plundering the planet? Did you hear her cry for justice and for a safe future for her children? If you didn’t, hit the play button again. And again … and again, till you do.

Amen.

Book Review: 8 Steps to Innovation, Going from Jugaad to Excellence

8 Steps to Innovation: Going from Jugaad to Excellence
Vinay Dabholkar & Rishikesha T. Krishnan

I have a confession to make. The cover led me to believe that this was another one of those innovation cookbooks by two opportunistic wannabe Jugaad aficionados (I still have a huge problem with the cover design in that it is trying hard to impress while succeeding to do just the opposite). The first chapter could only reinforce my belief that here was another version of the many ‘product improvement through R&D is innovation’ treatises that are strewn about ever since innovation became a fashion label. Am I glad that I persisted, if only to collect enough ammunition to tear it to shreds. Surprise, surprise! The book is not only an easy read but is a good resource for organizations that want to understand how to carry out innovation.

The authors give out two clear messages –

(1) that everybody can innovate,

(2) innovation success is less about isolated creative sparks than a concerted approach both to motivate the elephant (incentive) and direct the driver (clarity).

Help yourself to Innovation
Help yourself to Innovation

Continue reading “Book Review: 8 Steps to Innovation, Going from Jugaad to Excellence”

Creating Heart Capital

This post was first published in January 2009 but has gained renewed relevance in today’s crisis ridden world. It reminds us that too much focus on quantitative metrics can go only one way viz. downwards. (Incidentally, Knowledgeboard has since shut down.)

–Sunil Malhotra

 When I coined the phrase “Heart Capital” a few years ago, I didn’t recognise it’s prophetic undertones. And for those who might want to read my article, here’s the pdf Heart Capital.

The ideas and views regain relevance with today’s ‘communities’ on the collaborative web. (2.0)

Here’s John Moore’s comment on the article I wrote in 2003.

“I love these lines in particular :

To humanise is to recognise that technology cannot replace the charm of personal contact. To humanise is to disrupt current business thinking and methods. To humanise is to add emotion. To humanise is to add fun to work and work systems.

I think the discussion about emotional environment is important; a lot of money goes into trying to create great physical spaces for work (and that’s no bad thing) but the manners and subleties of human contact deserve equal attention.

I would add that as well as being fun, the creation of real “heart capital” requires taking risks and being vulnerable. Acknowledging our true feelings feels risky in many enviroments; yet in my experience it is often a touchstone for deeper and more satisfying human engagement.”

Thanks John! Continue reading “Creating Heart Capital”